Accelerator Directorate

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August 26, 2015
Press Release
A SLAC-led research team working at the lab’s FACET facility has demonstrated a new way of accelerating positrons that could help develop smaller, more economical future particle colliders.
August 7, 2015
News Feature
Scientists and engineers in South Korea will soon be using SLAC’s signature high-power radio-frequency amplifiers, called XL4 klystrons, to get the most out of their new X-ray laser.
June 8, 2015
News Feature
SLAC visiting scientist and consulting professor Claudio Pellegrini is honored for contributions to free-electron laser science.
Image - Claudio Pellegrini stands in the Linac Coherent Light Source Beam Transport Hall. The accelerated electron beam passes through here to the Undulator Hall, where electron bunches generate X-rays. (Michelle McCarron)
June 5, 2015
News Feature
How do accelerators survive in some of the most earthquake-prone regions on Earth?
May 5, 2015
News Feature
A commercial X-ray source with roots in SLAC research enables multi-mode computer tomography scans that outperform routine scans in hospitals. The technique could potentially find widespread use in medicine and other fields.
February 25, 2015
News Feature
A new study shows that crystals could become a valuable tool to control and manipulate electron beams in next-generation X-ray light sources and particle colliders.
January 16, 2015
News Feature
His election recognizes a long history of accomplishment that began more than two decades ago at the SLAC Linear Collider.
SLAC staff physicist Peter Rowson (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)
December 3, 2014
News Feature
SLAC and RadiaBeam Systems have teamed up to construct a “dechirper” that will allow scientists to adjust the “color spectrum” of X-ray pulses in pioneering LCLS experiments.
November 5, 2014
Press Release
Scientists have demonstrated that a promising technique for accelerating electrons on waves of hot plasma is efficient enough to power a new generation of shorter, more economical accelerators.
September 30, 2014
As charged-particle therapies grow in popularity, physicists are working with other experts to make them smaller, cheaper and more effective—and m

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