Accelerator Engineering

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September 11, 2014
News Feature
Three scientists at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory have received international prizes for their achievements in free-electron laser science.
Image - From left, SLAC's Erik Hemsing, Zhirong Huang and William Fawley accept awards during the 36th International Free Electron Laser Conference in Basel, Switzerland. At right is SLAC's Paul Emma, who served as this year's FEL Prize committee chairman
July 29, 2014
News Feature
Researchers at SLAC collaborate with small businesses to develop technology so it can benefit the world at large.
A copper acceleration cavity with an extremely thin coating of tungsten.
June 6, 2014
News Feature
SLAC scientists have found a new way to produce bright pulses of light from accelerated electrons that could shrink "light source" technology used around the world since the 1970s to examine details of atoms and chemical reactions.
Image - Muhammad Shumail, a PhD student, inspects the microwave undulator that he worked to design and build. (Fabricio Sousa/SLAC)
March 10, 2014
News Feature
A new system at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory's X-ray laser narrows a rainbow spectrum of X-ray colors to a more intense band of light, creating a much more powerful way to view fine details in samples at the scale of atoms and molecules.
Photo - A view of the soft X-ray self-seeding system during installation in the Undulator Hall at SLAC's Linac Coherent Light Source X-ray laser. (Brad Plummer/SLAC)
March 5, 2014
News Feature
A cooperative agreement with Palo-Alto based CPI opens the door to routine commercial manufacturing of these powerful vacuum tube devices, which convert electron beams into microwaves that are used to accelerate subatomic particles.
CPI President and Chief Operating Officer Robert A. Fickett, left, and SLAC Lab Director Chi-Chang Kao look at one of the XL5 klystrons the company built under a cooperative agreement with SLAC.
September 27, 2013
Press Release
In an advance that could dramatically shrink particle accelerators for science and medicine, researchers used a laser to accelerate electrons at a rate 10 times higher than conventional technology in a nanostructured glass chip smaller than a grain of rice.
Photo of two accelerator chips on the tip of a finger
June 2, 2011
News Feature
In 1971, physicist Burton Richter of Stanford Linear Accelerator Center was building a new type of particle collider called a storage ring.
soft X-ray fluorescence at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source

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